Jerome Upshaw Murder Case Update: Death And Obituary Details Released | All Global Updates

Jerome Upshaw Murder Case Update: Death and Obituary Details Released

The Jerome Upshaw murder case has been a source of controversy and speculation for years. Upshaw was arrested and charged with the murder of Joanne Walton in 1996, but questions about the case have lingered for decades. Recently, new information has come to light that sheds some light on what happened that fateful night.

According to reports, Upshaw was handcuffed and barefoot when he was detained by police outside his home in the dark. The reason for his detention was a noise complaint, which is not grounds for an arrest. However, when police searched his home, they found evidence that linked him to the murder of Walton. Upshaw was subsequently charged with the crime and has been in jail ever since.

The case has been the subject of much debate over the years, with some people questioning the evidence against Upshaw and others arguing that he was wrongly convicted. However, with the new information that has come to light, it seems that the case may finally be resolved.

The Murder of Jerome Upshaw

Jerome Upshaw was a man who was shot dead on December 7, 1996, in Columbus, Georgia. The murder took place alongside South Lumpkin Road. Joanne Walton, a prostitute, was the victim of the murder. She had arranged to give Jerome Upshaw oral sex in exchange for cocaine, but instead of paying her off, he shot her in the head and left her body.

The Crime Scene

The crime scene was discovered by a passerby who saw the body lying on the side of the road. The police arrived shortly after and began their investigation. They found a .38 caliber bullet casing near the body, which was later matched to a gun found in Upshaw’s possession. The police also found a small amount of cocaine in Walton’s pocket.

Suspects and Arrests

Jerome Upshaw was initially arrested for a noise complaint outside his home. He was handcuffed and barefoot as he stood outside his home in the dark with the police. However, the police soon discovered that he was a suspect in the murder of Joanne Walton. Upshaw was charged with murder and unlawful possession of a firearm during the commission of a felony.

During the trial, the prosecution presented evidence that Upshaw had been seen with Walton on the night of the murder. They also presented the .38 caliber bullet casing and the gun found in Upshaw’s possession. The defense argued that the evidence was circumstantial and that there was no direct link between Upshaw and the murder.

However, the jury found Upshaw guilty of murder and unlawful possession of a firearm during the commission of a felony. He was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. The case was later appealed to the Georgia Supreme Court, which corrected the sentencing but upheld Upshaw’s conviction.

Overall, the murder of Jerome Upshaw was a tragic event that shook the community of Columbus, Georgia. The investigation and trial were long and difficult, but justice was ultimately served.

Court Proceedings and Verdict

The Trial

Jerome Upshaw was tried by a Muscogee County jury for the murder of Joanne Walton. The trial took place in 2016 and lasted for several weeks. The prosecution presented evidence that Upshaw had shot Walton in the head and left her for dead alongside South Lumpkin Road on December 7, 1996. The defense argued that the evidence was circumstantial and that the prosecution had not proved Upshaw’s guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

During the trial, several witnesses testified against Upshaw, including a cold-case investigator who claimed that the leads were solid in the case. Upshaw also took the stand in his defense and denied any involvement in the murder. The trial ended with the jury finding Upshaw guilty of murder and unlawful possession of a firearm during the commission of a felony.

Sentencing and Appeals

In January 2017, the Georgia Supreme Court upheld Upshaw’s murder conviction but overturned his conviction for unlawful possession of a firearm. The court ruled that the trial court had erred when it limited Upshaw’s cross-examination of one prosecution witness.

Upshaw was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole for the murder conviction. He filed an appeal, but it was denied in 2019. Upshaw remains in prison to this day.

The trial and subsequent appeals were closely watched by the media and the public. Many people were shocked by the brutal nature of the crime and the fact that it took so long for justice to be served. The case serves as a reminder that even cold cases can be solved with the right resources and determination.